Archive for September, 2013

What is Fluorosis?

Saturday, September 28th, 2013

Fluorosis is one of those dental terms that you may have heard, but it’s not used enough for everyone to know what it is and whether or not it affects you. It is not a disease, but instead impacts the appearance of your teeth. Fluorosis usually shows up as faint white lines on your tooth enamel, but doesn’t affect your teeth’s health. If you’ve noticed light streaks of white on your teeth, or if you don’t want it to happen to your kids, read on for details about fluorosis.

Without already having fluorosis markings on your teeth, you’re in luck because you can’t get them after your teeth erupt. Enamel fluorosis happens only when your teeth are developing under your gums. Most cases of fluorosis occur as a result of swallowing flouride in products like toothpaste. That’s why it’s so important for parents to introduce fluoride toothpaste to children after age two, so that there will be less chance of the child swallowing it. After that age, parents should place only a pea-sized dab of fluoride toothpaste on a young child’s toothbrush, and supervise brushing the entire time. Teach children to spit toothpaste out instead of swallowing it.

Experts also suggest that mixing powdered or liquid infant formula concentrate with fluoridated water can increase the risk for fluorosis. Using fluoridated water to mix formula occasionally is acceptable, but doing so continually may not be a good idea. Fluoridated water, on the other hand, has been touted as being helpful in reducing tooth decay in kids and adults. So eliminating fluoride in your water completely may not be a good idea either. Talk with your dentist about fluoridated water to find out the right amount to aid dental health, but not put your child at risk for fluorosis.

Dental office in Richmond Virginia for Seniors

Should I Replace my Fillings?

Saturday, September 21st, 2013

Even with advances in dentistry, fillings don’t last forever. Your fillings will most likely need to be replaced at some point, depending on a variety of factors. The main things that affect the durability of your fillings are the type of material used, location and size of the filling, and your oral habits.

Amalgam fillings
Traditional metal fillings, made with amalgam, usually last 10-12 years. These are the fillings that are silver in color. The filling material is held in place by its shape fitting into the prepared hole in your tooth. With the loss of tooth structure and biting pressure over time, your tooth can weaken. Your dentist will recommend replacement if there is evidence that the filling is leaking, weakening, or allowing decay.

Composite resin fillings
Fillings made with resin material that is bonded to your tooth typically last 5-7 years. These popular fillings are tooth-colored and not as noticeable in your mouth. However, this type of material is susceptible to moisture in the tooth from saliva or blood. Plus, it is simply not as durable as amalgam. Your dentist will look for signs that indicate replacement is needed.

Size and location
The larger the filling, the more vulnerable the tooth is to leaking or breaking in the future. Also, teeth that must endure more chewing force are more susceptible to breakage and wear.

Oral habits
Habits like teeth grinding, nail biting, and dental hygiene affect the lifespan of fillings. Some habits wear down your fillings or create small breaks in your teeth. The best way to maintain fillings is to schedule regular dental checkups to have them monitored.

Cosmetic dental office in Richmond VA

Smokeless Tobacco Does Not Mean It’s Harmless

Sunday, September 15th, 2013

Everyone knows that tobacco is harmful to your health, but many people believe that smokeless tobacco doesn’t fall into the same category. Just because it’s smokeless doesn’t mean it’s harmless. It’s dangerous for your overall health, but also for your oral health. Here are some possible oral health outcomes of using smokeless tobacco.

Tooth decay
Smokeless tobacco contains sugar, which combines with the plaque on your teeth to damage your tooth enamel and cause decay.

Receding gums
Placing chewing tobacco in your mouth at the same spot over and over can permanently damage your gums. It can also harm your bone structure. Your irritated gums may pull away from your teeth, expose your tooth roots, and leave your teeth painful and susceptible to decay. Receding gums sometimes also loosen your teeth and cause them to eventually fall out.

Tooth discoloration
Smokeless tobacco stains your teeth, causing embarrassing yellow and brown discoloration. It is extremely difficult to remove with normal brushing, and even professional teeth whitening may not completely remove these stubborn stains.

Bad breath
Your breath will suffer from tobacco products of any kind. Don’t be fooled into thinking that mint-flavored smokeless tobacco hides the problem.

Tooth abrasion
Smokeless tobacco can be gritty and scratch your teeth, wearing down the enamel. Loss of tooth enamel increases sensitivity and may require treatment.

Cancer
The consistent placement of tobacco inside your gums and the irritating juices accompanying it can cause a pre-cancerous condition called leukoplakia. All smokeless tobacco contains cancer-causing agents, which subject users to higher cancer risk in the oral cavity, larynx, esophagus, and pharynx.

BRS Dentistry – Family dental office in Richmond VA

Should I Replace my Fillings?

Saturday, September 7th, 2013

Even with advances in dentistry, fillings don’t last forever. Your fillings will most likely need to be replaced at some point, depending on a variety of factors. The main things that affect the durability of your fillings are the type of material used, location and size of the filling, and your oral habits.

Amalgam fillings

Traditional metal fillings, made with amalgam, usually last 10-12 years. These are the fillings that are silver in color. The filling material is held in place by its shape fitting into the prepared hole in your tooth. With the loss of tooth structure and biting pressure over time, your tooth can weaken. Your dentist will recommend replacement if there is evidence that the filling is leaking, weakening, or allowing decay.

Composite resin fillings

Fillings made with resin material that is bonded to your tooth typically last 5-7 years. These popular fillings are tooth-colored and not as noticeable in your mouth. However, this type of material is susceptible to moisture in the tooth from saliva or blood. Plus, it is simply not as durable as amalgam. Your dentist will look for signs that indicate replacement is needed.

Size and location

The larger the filling, the more vulnerable the tooth is to leaking or breaking in the future. Also, teeth that must endure more chewing force are more susceptible to breakage and wear.

Oral habits

Habits like teeth grinding, nail biting, and dental hygiene affect the lifespan of fillings. Some habits wear down your fillings or create small breaks in your teeth. The best way to maintain fillings is to schedule regular dental checkups to have them monitored.

General and family dentist in Richmond VA

FREE Consultation

Schedule your appointment today!


.......................................................

Cosmetic Dentistry

Visit Our Before and After Gallery


.......................................................

Contact Us

Get Map Directions

804.684.8517

6901 Patterson Ave.
(Patterson at Three Chopt)
Richmond , VA 23226

804.886.3316

10410 Ridgefield Pkwy
(Ridgefield at Pump)
Richmond, VA 23233


.......................................................

 

Patient Testimonial

Dear Dr. Brown,
I wanted to thank you and your entire staff for my recent dental experience at your Patterson office. Everyone exceeded my expectations in making my dental visits comfortable, from scheduling to the finish of my procedure. I truly felt everyone cared about me as an individual and took special steps to

click here for entire testimonial